Operating System

LINUX

From smartphones to cars, supercomputers and home appliances, the Linux operating system is everywhere. It’s been around since the mid ‘90s, and has since reached a user-base that spans industries and continents. For those in the know, you understand that Linux is actually everywhere. It’s in your phones, in your cars, in your refrigerators, your Roku devices. It runs most of the Internet, the supercomputers making scientific breakthroughs, and the world\’s stock exchanges. But before Linux became the platform to run desktops, servers, and embedded systems across the globe, it was (and still is) one of the most reliable, secure, and worry-free operating systems available. For those not in the know, worry not – here is all the information you need to get up to speed on the Linux platform.

LINUX Operating System Navi Mumbai

SUN-SOLARIS

Solaris is a Unix operating system originally developed by Sun Microsystems. It superseded their earlier SunOS in 1993. Oracle Solaris, so named as of 2010, has been owned by Oracle Corporation since the Sun acquisition by Oracle in January 2010.

Solaris is known for its scalability, especially on SPARC systems, and for originating many innovative features such as DT race, and Time Slider. Solaris supports SPARC-based and x86-based workstations and servers from Oracle and other vendors, with efforts underway to port to additional platforms. Solaris is registered as compliant with the Single UNIX Specification.

SUN-SOLARIS Operating System Navi Mumbai

Historically, Solaris was developed as proprietary software. In June 2005, Sun Microsystems released most of the codebase under the CDDL license, and founded the Open Solaris open source project .With Open Solaris, Sun wanted to build a developer and user community around the software. After the acquisition of Sun Microsystems in January 2010, Oracle decided to discontinue the Open Solaris distribution and the development model. In August 2010, Oracle discontinued providing public updates to the source code of the Solaris kernel, effectively turning Solaris 11 back into a closed source proprietary operating system Following that, in 2011 the Solaris 11 kernel source code leaked to However, through the Oracle Technology Network (OTN), industry partners can still gain access to the in-development Solaris source code .Source code for the open source components of Solaris 11 is available for download from Oracle.